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SOLVED - $1000
Can the smallest modulus of a covering system be arbitrarily large?
Described by Erdős as 'perhaps my favourite problem'. Hough [Ho15], building on work of Filaseta, Ford, Konyagin, Pomerance, and Yu [FFKPY07], has shown the answer is no: the smallest modulus must be at most $10^{18}$.

An alternative, simpler, proof was given by Balister, Bollobás, Morris, Sahasrabudhe, and Tiba [BBMST22], who improved the bound on the smallest modulus to $616000$.

OPEN
Is there a covering system all of whose moduli are odd?
Asked by Erdős and Selfridge (sometimes also with Schinzel). They also asked whether there can be a covering system such that all the moduli are odd and squarefree. The answer to this stronger question is no, proved by Balister, Bollobás, Morris, Sahasrabudhe, and Tiba [BBMST22].

Hough and Nielsen [HoNi19] proved that at least one modulus must be divisible by either $2$ or $3$. A simpler proof of this fact was provided by Balister, Bollobás, Morris, Sahasrabudhe, and Tiba [BBMST22].

Selfridge has shown (as reported in [Sc67]) that such a covering system exists if a covering system exists with moduli $n_1,\ldots,n_k$ such that no $n_i$ divides any other $n_j$ (but the latter has been shown not to exist, see [586]).

Additional thanks to: Antonio Girao
SOLVED
For any finite colouring of the integers is there a covering system all of whose moduli are monochromatic?
Conjectured by Erdős and Graham, who also ask about a density-type version: for example, is \[\sum_{\substack{a\in A\\ a>N}}\frac{1}{a}\gg \log N\] a sufficient condition for $A$ to contain the moduli of a covering system? The answer (to both colouring and density versions) is no, due to the result of Hough [Ho15] on the minimum size of a modulus in a covering system - in particular one could colour all integers $<10^{18}$ different colours and all other integers a new colour.
OPEN
Let $A$ be the set of all integers not of the form $p+2^{k}+2^l$ (where $k,l\geq 0$ and $p$ is prime). Is the upper density of $A$ positive?
Crocker [Cr71] has proved there are are $\gg\log\log N$ such integers in $\{1,\ldots,N\}$ (any number of the form $2^{2^m}-1$ with $m\geq 3$ suffices). Pan [Pa11] improved this to $\gg_\epsilon N^{1-\epsilon}$ for any $\epsilon>0$. Erdős believes this cannot be proved by covering systems, i.e. integers of the form $p+2^k+2^l$ exist in every infinite arithmetic progression.

See also [10], [11], and [16].

OPEN
Is there some $k$ such that every integer is the sum of a prime and at most $k$ powers of 2?
Erdős described this as 'probably unattackable'. In [ErGr80] Erdős and Graham suggest that no such $k$ exists. Gallagher [Ga75] has shown that for any $\epsilon>0$ there exists $k(\epsilon)$ such that the set of integers which are the sum of a prime and at most $k(\epsilon)$ many powers of 2 has lower density at least $1-\epsilon$.

Granville and Soundararajan [GrSo98] have conjectured that at most $3$ powers of 2 suffice for all odd integers, and hence at most $4$ powers of $2$ suffice for all even integers. (The restriction to odd integers is important here - for example, Bogdan Grechuk has observed that $1117175146$ is not the sum of a prime and at most $3$ powers of $2$, and pointed out that parity considerations, coupled with the fact that there are many integers not the sum of a prime and $2$ powers of $2$ (see [9]) suggest that there exist infinitely many even integers which are not the sum of a prime and at most $3$ powers of $2$).

See also [9], [11], and [16].

Additional thanks to: Bogdan Grechuk
OPEN
Is every odd $n$ the sum of a squarefree number and a power of 2?
Odlyzko has checked this up to $10^7$. Granville and Soundararajan [GrSo98] have proved that this is very related to the problem of finding primes $p$ for which $2^p\equiv 2\pmod{p^2}$ (for example this conjecture implies there are infinitely many such $p$).

This is equivalent to asking whether every $n$ not divisible by $4$ is the sum of a squarefree number and a power of two. Erdős thought that proving this with two powers of 2 is perhaps easy, and could prove that it is true (with a single power of two) for almost all $n$.

See also [9], [10], and [16].

Additional thanks to: Milos
OPEN
Let $A$ be an infinite set such that there are no distinct $a,b,c\in A$ such that $a\mid (b+c)$ and $b,c>a$. Is there such an $A$ with \[\liminf \frac{\lvert A\cap\{1,\ldots,N\}\rvert}{N^{1/2}}>0?\] Does there exist some absolute constant $c>0$ such that there are always infinitely many $N$ with \[\lvert A\cap\{1,\ldots,N\}\rvert<N^{1-c}?\]

Is it true that \[\sum_{n\in A}\frac{1}{n}<\infty?\]

Asked by Erdős and Sárközy [ErSa70], who proved that $A$ must have density $0$. They also prove that this is essentially best possible, in that given any function $f(x)\to \infty$ as $x\to \infty$ there exists a set $A$ with this property and infinitely many $N$ such that \[\lvert A\cap\{1,\ldots,N\}\rvert>\frac{N}{f(N)}.\] (Their example is given by all integers in $(y_i,\frac{3}{2}y_i)$ congruent to $1$ modulo $(2y_{i-1})!$, where $y_i$ is some sufficiently quickly growing sequence.)

An example of an $A$ with this property where \[\liminf \frac{\lvert A\cap\{1,\ldots,N\}\rvert}{N^{1/2}}\log N>0\] is given by the set of $p^2$, where $p\equiv 3\pmod{4}$ is prime.

For the finite version see [13].

SOLVED - $100
Let $A\subseteq \{1,\ldots,N\}$ be such that there are no $a,b,c\in A$ such that $a\mid(b+c)$ and $a<\min(b,c)$. Is it true that $\lvert A\rvert\leq N/3+O(1)$?
Asked by Erdős and Sárközy, who observed that $(2N/3,N]\cap \mathbb{N}$ is such a set. The answer is yes, as proved by Bedert [Be23].

For the infinite version see [12].

Additional thanks to: Zachary Chase
OPEN
Let $A\subseteq \mathbb{N}$. Let $B\subseteq \mathbb{N}$ be the set of integers which are representable in exactly one way as the sum of two elements from $A$. Is it true that for all $\epsilon>0$ and large $N$ \[\lvert \{1,\ldots,N\}\backslash B\rvert \gg_\epsilon N^{1/2-\epsilon}.\]
Asked by Erdős, Sárközy, and Szemerédi, who constructed an $A$ such that for all $\epsilon>0$ and all large $N$ \[\lvert \{1,\ldots,N\}\backslash B\rvert \ll_\epsilon N^{1/2+\epsilon},\] and yet there for all $\epsilon>0$ there exist infinitely many $N$ where \[\lvert \{1,\ldots,N\}\backslash B\rvert \gg_\epsilon N^{1/3-\epsilon}.\]

Erdös and Freud investigated the finite analogue in 'a recent Hungarian paper', proving that there exists $A\subseteq \{1,\ldots,N\}$ such that the number of integers not representable in exactly one way as the sum of two elements from $A$ is $<2^{3/2}N^{1/2}$, and suggest the constant $2^{3/2}$ is perhaps best possible.

OPEN
Is it true that \[\sum_{n=1}^\infty(-1)^n\frac{n}{p_n}\] converges, where $p_n$ is the sequence of primes?
Erdős suggested that a computer could be used to explore this, and did not see any other method to attack this.

Tao [Ta23] has proved that this series does converge assuming a strong form of the Hardy-Littlewood prime tuples conjecture.

OPEN - $250
Let $A$ be a finite set of integers. Is it true that for every $\epsilon>0$ \[\max( \lvert A+A\rvert,\lvert AA\rvert)\gg_\epsilon \lvert A\rvert^{2-\epsilon}?\]
The sum-product problem. Erdős and Szemerédi [ErSz83] proved a lower bound of $\lvert A\rvert^{1+c}$ for some constant $c>0$, and an upper bound of $o(\lvert A\rvert^2)$. The lower bound has been improved a number of times. The current record is \[\max( \lvert A+A\rvert,\lvert AA\rvert)\gg\lvert A\rvert^{\frac{1558}{1167}-o(1)}\] due to Rudnev and Stevens [RuSt22] (note $1558/1167=1.33504\cdots$).

There is likely nothing special about the integers in this question, and indeed Erdős and Szemerédi also ask a similar question about finite sets of real or complex numbers. The current best bound for sets of reals is the same bound of Rudnev and Stevens above. The best bound for complex numbers is \[\max( \lvert A+A\rvert,\lvert AA\rvert)\gg\lvert A\rvert^{\frac{5}{4}},\] due to Solymosi [So05].

One can in general ask this question in any setting where addition and multiplication are defined (once one avoids any trivial obstructions such as zero divisors or finite subfields). For example, it makes sense for subsets of finite fields. The current record is that if $A\subseteq \mathbb{F}_p$ with $\lvert A\rvert <p^{5/8}$ then \[\max( \lvert A+A\rvert,\lvert AA\rvert)\gg\lvert A\rvert^{\frac{11}{9}+o(1)},\] due to Rudnev, Shakan, and Shkredov [RSS20].

There is also a natural generalisation to higher-fold sum and product sets. For example, in [ErSz83] Erdős and Szemerédi also conjecture that for any $m\geq 2$ and finite set of integers $A$ \[\max( \lvert mA\rvert,\lvert A^m\rvert)\gg \lvert A\rvert^{m-o(1)}.\] See [53] for more on this generalisation and [808] for a stronger form of the original conjecture.

Additional thanks to: Akshat Mudgal
SOLVED
Let $A$ be a finite set of integers. Is it true that, for every $k$, if $\lvert A\rvert$ is sufficiently large depending on $k$, then there are least $\lvert A\rvert^k$ many integers which are either the sum or product of distinct elements of $A$?
Asked by Erdős and Szemerédi [ErSz83]. Solved in this form by Chang [Ch03].

See also [52].

OPEN
Is \[\sum_{n\geq 2}\frac{1}{n!-1}\] irrational?
OPEN - $500
Does every set of $n$ distinct points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ determine $\gg n/\sqrt{\log n}$ many distinct distances?
A $\sqrt{n}\times\sqrt{n}$ integer grid shows that this would be the best possible. Nearly solved by Guth and Katz [GuKa15] who proved that there are always $\gg n/\log n$ many distinct distances.

A stronger form (see [604]) may be true: is there a single point which determines $\gg n/\sqrt{\log n}$ distinct distances, or even $\gg n$ many such points, or even that this is true averaged over all points.

See also [661].

OPEN - $500
Does every set of $n$ distinct points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ contain at most $n^{1+O(1/\log\log n)}$ many pairs which are distance 1 apart?
The unit distance problem. In [Er94b] Erdős dates this conjecture to 1946.

This would be the best possible, as is shown by a set of lattice points. It is easy to show that there are $O(n^{3/2})$ many such pairs. The best known upper bound is $O(n^{4/3})$, due to Spencer, Szemerédi, and Trotter [SST84]. In [Er83c] and [Er85] Erdős offers \$250 for an upper bound of the form $n^{1+o(1)}$.

Part of the difficulty of this problem is explained by a result of Valtr (see [Sz16]), who constructed a metric on $\mathbb{R}^2$ and a set of $n$ points with $\gg n^{4/3}$ unit distance pairs (with respect to this metric). The methods of the upper bound proof of Spencer, Szemerédi, and Trotter [SST84] generalise to include this metric. Therefore to prove an upper bound better than $n^{4/3}$ some special feature of the Euclidean metric must be exploited.

See a survey by Szemerédi [Sz16] for further background and related results.

See also [92], [96], and [605].

OPEN
Suppose $A\subset \mathbb{R}^2$ has $\lvert A\rvert=n$ and minimises the number of distinct distances between points in $A$. Prove that for large $n$ there are at least two (and probably many) such $A$ which are non-similar.
For $n=5$ the regular pentagon is the unique such set (Erdős mysteriously remarks this was proved by 'a colleague').
SOLVED
If $n$ distinct points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ form a convex polygon then they determine at least $\lfloor \frac{n+1}{2}\rfloor$ distinct distances.
Solved by Altman [Al63]. The stronger variant that says there is one point which determines at least $\lfloor \frac{n+1}{2}\rfloor$ distinct distances is still open. Fishburn in fact conjectures that if $R(x)$ counts the number of distinct distances from $x$ then \[\sum_{x\in A}R(x) \geq \binom{n}{2}.\]

Szemerédi conjectured (see [Er97e]) that this stronger variant remains true if we only assume that no three points are on a line, and proved this with the weaker bound of $n/3$.

See also [660].

OPEN
If $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ form a convex polygon then there are $O(n)$ many pairs which are distance $1$ apart.
Conjectured by Erdős and Moser. Füredi [Fu90] proved an upper bound of $O(n\log n)$. A short proof of this bound was given by Brass and Pach [BrPa01]. The best known upper bound is \[\leq n\log_2n+4n,\] due to Aggarwal [Ag15].

Edelsbrunner and Hajnal [EdHa91] have constructed $n$ such points with $2n-7$ pairs distance $1$ apart. (This disproved an early stronger conjecture of Erdős and Moser, that the true answer was $\frac{5}{3}n+O(1)$.)

A positive answer would follow from [97]. See also [90].

OPEN - $100
Does every convex polygon have a vertex with no other $4$ vertices equidistant from it?
Erdős originally conjectured this with no $3$ vertices equidistant, but Danzer found a convex polygon on 9 points such that every vertex has three vertices equidistant from it (but this distance depends on the vertex), and Fishburn and Reeds [FiRe92] have found a convex polygon on 20 points such that every vertex has three vertices equidistant from it (and this distance is the same for all vertices).

If this fails for $4$, perhaps there is some constant for which it holds?

Erdős suggested this as an approach to solve [96]. Indeed, if this problem holds for $k+1$ vertices then, by induction, this implies an upper bound of $kn$ for [96].

The answer is no if we omit the requirement that the polygon is convex (I thank Boris Alexeev and Dustin Mixon for pointing this out), since for any $d$ there are graphs with minimum degree $d$ which can be embedded in the plane such that each edge has length one (for example one can take the $d$-dimensional hypercube graph on $2^d$ vertices). One can then connect the vertices in a cyclic order so that there are no self-intersections and no three consecutive vertices on a line, thus forming a (non-convex) polygon.

Additional thanks to: Boris Alexeev and Dustin Mixon
OPEN
Let $h(n)$ be such that any $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$, with no three on a line and no four on a circle, determine at least $h(n)$ distinct distances. Does $h(n)/n\to \infty$?
Erdős could not even prove $h(n)\geq n$. Pach has shown $h(n)<n^{\log_23}$. Erdős, Füredi, and Pach have improved this to \[h(n) < n\exp(c\sqrt{\log n})\] for some constant $c>0$.
OPEN - $100
Let $A\subseteq\mathbb{R}^2$ be a set of $n$ points with minimum distance equal to 1, chosen to minimise the diameter of $A$. If $n$ is sufficiently large then must there be three points in $A$ which form an equilateral triangle of size 1?
Thue proved that the minimal such diameter is achieved (asymptotically) by the points in a triangular lattice intersected with a circle. In general Erdős believed such a set must have very large intersection with the triangular lattice (perhaps as many as $(1-o(1))n$).

Erdős [Er94b] wrote 'I could not prove it but felt that it should not be hard. To my great surprise both B. H. Sendov and M. Simonovits doubted the truth of this conjecture.' In [Er94b] he offers \$100 for a counterexample but only \$50 for a proof.

The stated problem is false for $n=4$, for example taking the points to be vertices of a square. The behaviour of such sets for small $n$ is explored by Bezdek and Fodor [BeFo99].

See also [103].

Additional thanks to: Boris Alexeev and Dustin Mixon
OPEN - $500
Let $f(n)$ be minimal such that any $f(n)$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$, no three on a line, contain $n$ points which form the vertices of a convex $n$-gon. Prove that $f(n)=2^{n-2}+1$.
The Erdős-Klein-Szekeres 'Happy Ending' problem. The problem originated in 1931 when Klein observed that $f(4)=5$. Turán and Makai showed $f(5)=9$. Erdős and Szekeres proved the bounds \[2^{n-2}+1\leq f(n)\leq \binom{2n-4}{n-2}+1.\] ([ErSz60] and [ErSz35] respectively). There were several improvements of the upper bound, but all of the form $4^{(1+o(1))n}$, until Suk [Su17] proved \[f(n) \leq 2^{(1+o(1))n}.\] The current best bound is due to Holmsen, Mojarrad, Pach, and Tardos [HMPT20], who prove \[f(n) \leq 2^{n+O(\sqrt{n\log n})}.\]

In [Er97e] Erdős clarifies that the \$500 is for a proof, and only offers \$100 for a disproof.

This problem is #1 in Ramsey Theory in the graphs problem collection.

See also [216] and [651].

Additional thanks to: Casey Tompkins
SOLVED
Let $F_{k}(N)$ be the size of the largest $A\subseteq \{1,\ldots,N\}$ such that the product of no $k$ many distinct elements of $A$ is a square. Is $F_5(N)=(1-o(1))N$? More generally, is $F_{2k+1}(N)=(1-o(1))N$?
Conjectured by Erdős, Sós, and Sárkzözy [ESS95], who proved \[F_2(N)=\left(\frac{6}{\pi^2}+o(1)\right)N,\] \[F_3(N) = (1-o(1))N,\] and also established asymptotics for $F_k(N)$ for all even $k\geq 4$ (for which $F_k(N)\asymp N/\log N$ for all even $k\geq 4$. Erdős [Er38] earlier proved that $F_4(N)=o(N)$ (indeed, if $\lvert A\rvert \gg N$ and $A\subseteq \{1,\ldots,N\}$ then there is a non-trivial solution to $ab=cd$ with $a,b,c,d\in A$.)

Erdős (and independently Hall [Ha96] and Montgomery) also asked about $F(N)$, the size of the largest $A\subseteq\{1,\ldots,N\}$ such that the product of no odd number of $a\in A$ is a square. Ruzsa [Ru77] observed that $1/2<\lim F(N)/N <1$. Granville and Soundararajan [GrSo01] proved an asymptotic \[F(N)=(1-c+o(1))N\] where $c=0.1715\ldots$ is an explicit constant.

This problem was answered in the negative by Tao [Ta24], who proved that for any $k\geq 4$ there is some constant $c_k>0$ such that $F_k(N) \leq (1-c_k+o(1))N$.

OPEN
Let $f(n)$ be a number theoretic function which grows slowly (e.g. slower than $(\log n)^{1-c}$) and $F(n)$ be such that for almost all $n$ we have $f(n)/F(n)\to 0$. When are there infinitely many $x$ such that \[\frac{\#\{ n\in \mathbb{N} : n+f(n)\in (x,x+F(x))\}}{F(x)}\to \infty?\]
Conjectured by Erdős, Pomerance, and Sárközy [ErPoSa97] who prove this when $f$ is the divisor function or the number of distinct prime divisors of $n$, but Erdős believed it is false when $f(n)=\phi(n)$ or $\sigma(n)$.
OPEN - $250
Let $a,b,c$ be three integers which are pairwise coprime. Is every large integer the sum of distinct integers of the form $a^kb^lc^m$ ($k,l,m\geq 0$), none of which divide any other?
Conjectured by Erdős and Lewin [ErLe96], who (among other related results) prove this when $a=3$, $b=5$, and $c=7$.
OPEN
Let $3\leq d_1<d_2<\cdots <d_k$ be integers such that \[\sum_{1\leq i\leq k}\frac{1}{d_i-1}\geq 1.\] Can all sufficiently large integers be written as a sum of the shape $\sum_i c_ia_i$ where $c_i\in \{0,1\}$ and $a_i$ has only the digits $0,1$ when written in base $d_i$?
Conjectured by Burr, Erdős, Graham, and Li [BEGL96]. Pomerance observed that the condition $\sum 1/(d_i-1)\geq 1$ is necessary. In [BEGL96] they prove the property holds for $\{3,4,7\}$.

See also [125].

Additional thanks to: Boris Alexeev and Dustin Mixon
OPEN - $250
Let $f(n)$ be maximal such that if $A\subseteq\mathbb{N}$ has $\lvert A\rvert=n$ then $\prod_{a\neq b\in A}(a+b)$ has at least $f(n)$ distinct prime factors. Is it true that $f(n)/\log n\to\infty$?
Investigated by Erdős and Turán [ErTu34] (prompted by a question of Lázár and Grünwald) in their first joint paper, where they proved that \[\log n \ll f(n) \ll n/\log n\] (the upper bound is trivial, taking $A=\{1,\ldots,n\}$). Erdős says that $f(n)=o(n/\log n)$ has never been proved, but perhaps never seriously attacked.
OPEN - $100
Let $A\subset \mathbb{R}^2$ be a set of $n$ points. Must there be two distances which occur at least once but between at most $n$ pairs of points? Must the number of such distances $\to \infty$ as $n\to \infty$?
Asked by Erdős and Pach. Hopf and Pannowitz [HoPa34] proved that the largest distance between points of $A$ can occur at most $n$ times, but it is unknown whether a second such distance must occur.

It may be true that there are at least $n^{1-o(1)}$ many such distances. In [Er97e] Erdős offers \$100 for 'any nontrivial result'.

See also [223] and [756].

SOLVED
Let $g(k)$ be the smallest integer (if any such exists) such that any $g(k)$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ contains an empty convex $k$-gon (i.e. with no point in the interior). Does $g(k)$ exist? If so, estimate $g(k)$.
A variant of the 'happy ending' problem [107], which asks for the same without the 'no point in the interior' restriction. Erdős observed $g(4)=5$ (as with the happy ending problem) but Harborth [Ha78] showed $g(5)=10$. Nicolás [Ni07] and Gerken [Ge08] independently showed that $g(6)$ exists. Horton [Ho83] showed that $g(n)$ does not exist for $n\geq 7$.

This problem is #2 in Ramsey Theory in the graphs problem collection.

Additional thanks to: Zachary Hunter
OPEN
For which $n$ are there $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$, no three on a line and no four on a circle, which determine $n-1$ distinct distances and so that (in some ordering of the distances) the $i$th distance occurs $i$ times?
An example with $n=4$ is an isosceles triangle with the point in the centre. Erdős originally believed this was impossible for $n\geq 5$, but Pomerance constructed a set with $n=5$ (see [Er83c] for a description), and Palásti has proved such sets exist for all $n\leq 8$. Erdős believes this is impossible for all sufficiently large $n$.
OPEN
Show that the equation \[n! = a_1!a_2!\cdots a_k!,\] with $n-1>a_1\geq a_2\geq \cdots \geq a_k$, has only finitely many solutions.
This would follow if $P(n(n+1))/\log n\to \infty$, where $P(m)$ denotes the largest prime factor of $m$ (see Problem [368]). Hickerson conjectured the largest solution is \[16! = 14! 5!2!.\] The condition $a_1<n-1$ is necessary to rule out the trivial solutions when $n=a_2!\cdots a_k!$.

Surányi was the first to conjecture that the only non-trivial solution to $a!b!=n!$ is $6!7!=10!$.

SOLVED
Is there a covering system such that no two of the moduli divide each other?
Asked by Schinzel, motivated by a question of Erdős and Selfridge (see [7]). The answer is no, as proved by Balister, Bollobás, Morris, Sahasrabudhe, and Tiba [BBMST22].
OPEN - $500
Given $n$ distinct points $A\subset\mathbb{R}^2$ must there be a point $x\in A$ such that \[\#\{ d(x,y) : y \in A\} \gg n^{1-o(1)}?\] Or even $\gg n/\sqrt{\log n}$?
The pinned distance problem, a stronger form of [89]. The example of an integer grid show that $n/\sqrt{\log n}$ would be best possible.

It may be true that there are $\gg n$ many such points, or that this is true on average. In [Er97e] Erdős offers \$500 for a solution to this problem, but it is unclear whether he intended this for proving the existence of a single such point or for $\gg n$ many such points.

In [Er97e] Erdős wrote that he initially 'overconjectured' and thought that the answer to this problem is the same as for the number of distinct distances between all pairs (see [89]), but this was disproved by Harborth. It could be true that the answers are the same up to an additive factor of $n^{o(1)}$.

The best known bound is \[\gg n^{c-o(1)},\] due to Katz and Tardos [KaTa04], where \[c=\frac{48-14e}{55-16e}=0.864137\cdots.\]

OPEN
Let $p_1,\ldots,p_k$ be distinct primes. Are there are infinitely many $n$ such that $n!$ is divisible by an even power of each of the $p_i$?
SOLVED
Let $f_k(n)$ denote the smallest integer such that any $f_k(n)$ points in general position in $\mathbb{R}^k$ contain at $n$ which determine a convex polyhedron. Is it true that \[f_k(n) > (1+c_k)^n\] for some constant $c_k>0$?
The function when $k=2$ is the subject of the Erdős-Klein-Szekeres conjecture, see [107]. One can show that \[f_2(n)>f_3(n)>\cdots.\] The answer is no, even for $k=3$: Pohoata and Zakharov [PoZa22] have proved that \[f_3(n)\leq 2^{o(n)}.\]
Additional thanks to: Mehtaab Sawhney
OPEN
Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ and let $R(x_i)=\#\{ \lvert x_j-x_i\rvert : j\neq i\}$, where the points are ordered such that \[R(x_1)\leq \cdots \leq R(x_n).\] Let $\alpha_k$ be minimal such that, for all large enough $n$, there exists a set of $n$ points with $R(x_k)<\alpha_kn^{1/2}$. Is it true that $\alpha_k\to \infty$ as $k\to \infty$?
It is trivial that $R(x_1)=1$ is possible, and that $R(x_2) \ll n^{1/2}$ is also possible, but we always have \[R(x_1)R(x_2)\gg n.\] Erdős originally conjectured that $R(x_3)/n^{1/2}\to \infty$ as $n\to \infty$, but Elekes proved that for every $k$ and $n$ sufficiently large there exists some set of $n$ points with $R(x_k)\ll_k n^{1/2}$.
OPEN
Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ and let $R(x_i)=\#\{ \lvert x_j-x_i\rvert : j\neq i\}$, where the points are ordered such that \[R(x_1)\leq \cdots \leq R(x_n).\] Let $g(n)$ be the maximum number of distinct values the $R(x_i)$ can take. Is it true that $g(n) \geq (1-o(1))n$?
Erdős and Fishburn proved $g(n)>\frac{3}{9}n$ and Csizmadia proved $g(n)>\frac{7}{10}n$. Both groups proved $g(n) < n-cn^{2/3}$ for some constant $c>0$.
OPEN
Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ with no four points on a circle. Must there exist some $x_i$ with at least $(1-o(1))n$ distinct distances to other $x_i$?
It is clear that every point has at least $\frac{n-1}{3}$ distinct distances to other points in the set.
OPEN
Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ be such that no circle whose centre is one of the $x_i$ contains three other points. Are there at least \[(1+c)\frac{n}{2}\] distinct distances determined between the $x_i$, for some constant $c>0$ and all $n$ sufficiently large?
A problem of Erdős and Pach. It is easy to see that this assumption implies that there are at least $\frac{n-1}{2}$ distinct distances determined by every point.
OPEN
Is it true that if $A\subset \mathbb{R}^2$ is a set of $n$ points such that every subset of $4$ points determines at least $5$ distances then $A$ must determine $\gg n^2$ distances?
A problem of Erdős and Gyárfás. Erdős could not even prove that the number of distances is at least $f(n)n$ where $f(n)\to \infty$.

More generally, one can ask how many distances $A$ must determine if every set of $p$ points determines at least $q$ points.

See also [657].

OPEN
Is it true that if $A\subset \mathbb{R}^2$ is a set of $n$ points such that every subset of $3$ points determines $3$ distinct distances (i.e. $A$ has no isosceles triangles) then $A$ must determine at least $f(n)n$ distinct distances, for some $f(n)\to \infty$?
In [Er73] Erdős attributes this problem (more generally in $\mathbb{R}^k$) to himself and Davies. In [Er97e] he does not mention Davis, but says this problem was investigated by himself, Füredi, Ruzsa, and Pach.

In [Er73] Erdős says it is not even known in $\mathbb{R}$ whether $f(n)\to \infty$. Straus has observed that if $2^k\geq n$ then there exist $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^k$ which contain no isosceles triangle and determine at most $n-1$ distances.

See also [656].

SOLVED
Let $\delta>0$ and $N$ be sufficiently large depending on $\delta$. Is it true that if $A\subseteq \{1,\ldots,N\}^2$ has $\lvert A\rvert \geq \delta N^2$ then $A$ must contain the vertices of a square?
A problem of Graham, if the square is restricted to be axis-aligned. (It is unclear whether in [Er97e] had this restriction in mind.)

This qualitative statement follows from the density Hales-Jewett theorem proved by Furstenberg and Katznelson [FuKa91]. A quantitative proof (yet with very poor bounds) was given by Solymosi [So04].

OPEN
Is there a set of $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$ such that every subset of $4$ points determines at least $3$ distances, yet the total number of distinct distances is \[\ll \frac{n}{\sqrt{\log n}}?\]
Erdős believed this should be possible, and should imply effective upper bounds for [658] (presumably the version with no alignment restrictions on the squares).
OPEN
Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^3$ be the vertices of a convex polyhedron. Is there some constant $c>0$ such that, for all $n$ sufficiently large, the number of distinct distances determined by the $x_i$ is at most \[(1-c)\frac{n}{2}?\]
For the similar problem in $\mathbb{R}^2$ there are always at least $n/2$ distances, as proved by Altman [Al63] (see [93]).
OPEN
Are there, for all large $n$, some points $x_1,\ldots,x_n,y_1,\ldots,y_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ such that the number of distinct distances $d(x_i,y_j)$ is \[o\left(\frac{n}{\sqrt{\log n}}\right)?\]
One can also ask this for points in $\mathbb{R}^3$. In $\mathbb{R}^4$ Lenz observed that there are $x_1,\ldots,x_n,y_1,\ldots,y_n\in \mathbb{R}^4$ such that $d(x_i,y_j)=1$ for all $i,j$, taking the points on two orthogonal circles.

More generally, if $F(2n)$ is the minimal number of such distances, and $f(2n)$ is minimal number of distinct distances between any $2n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^2$, then is $f \ll F$?

See also [89].

OPEN
Consider the triangular lattice with minimal distance between two points $1$. Denote by $f(t)$ the number of distances from any points $\leq t$. For example $f(1)=6$, $f(\sqrt{3})=12$, and $f(3)=18$.

Let $x_1,\ldots,x_n\in \mathbb{R}^2$ be such that $d(x_i,x_j)\geq 1$ for all $i\neq j$. Is it true that, provided $n$ is sufficiently large depending on $t$, the number of distances $d(x_i,x_j)\leq t$ is less than or equal to $f(t)$ with equality perhaps only for the triangular lattice?

In particular, is it true that the number of distances $\leq \sqrt{3}-\epsilon$ is less than $1$?

A problem of Erdős, Lovász, and Vesztergombi.

This is essentially verbatim the problem description in [Er97e], but this does not make sense as written; there must be at least one typo. Suggestions about what this problem intends are welcome.

Erdős also goes on to write 'Perhaps the following stronger conjecture holds: Let $t_1<t_2<\cdots$ be the set of distances occurring in the triangular lattice. $t_1=1$ $t_2=\sqrt{3}$ $t_3=3$ $t_4=5$ etc. Is it true that there is an $\epsilon_n$ so that for every set $y_1,\ldots,$ with $d(y_i,y_j)\geq 1$ the number of distances $d(y_i,y_j)<t_n$ is less than $f(t_n)$?'

Again, this is nonsense interpreted literally; I am not sure what Erdős intended.

OPEN
Let $q(n,k)$ denote the least prime which does not divide $\prod_{1\leq i\leq k}(n+i)$. Is it true that, if $k$ is fixed and $n$ is sufficiently large, we have \[q(n,k)<(1+o(1))\log n?\]
A problem of Erdős and Pomerance.

The bound $q(n,k)<(1+o(1))k\log n$ is easy. It may be true this improved bound holds even up to $k=o(\log n)$.

See also [457].